Interview with Steampunk’d maker Ed ‘Steampunk Eddie’ Thayer, Part 2

Welcome back for the conclusion in our talk with Steampunk Eddie, who was one of the ten contestants on Steampunk’d, from GSN, the Game Show Network. Steampunk’d is the first steampunk reality show to be broadcast on cable television.

Read part one here.

 

Airship Ambassador: Once you were selected in the final ten to appear on the show, what preparations did you have to make before you left for Los Angeles? What were you leaving behind or had to put on hold while you were away for filming?

Steampunk Eddie: I worked my ass off. I had to work hard to complete client’s projects before I left. I had to “get paid” so I could pay ahead on my bills and leave with an open head, heart and soul – so I could kick ass.

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AA: Without giving spoilers, what interesting things might viewers see in the episodes you were in?

SE: The viewers got to see the real deal – the good, the bad, the ugly. As I said earlier I gotta be me – and I was through every episode. When I needed to apologize I did. I manned up and made it right with my castmates.

 

AA: What are some memorable moments you had during filming?

SE: During episode five, I was pushed to my limits. When I saw how cut-throat this whole experience was becoming- I lost it. I took a moment to go out into the Punkyard and took my frustration out on the cabinet. The crew asked if I needed a medic – I said “Hell NO! But I may need bail money”. Afterwards I went right back to work and finished the challenge.

 

AA: What are some factors that you had in common with the other contestants or set you apart? (creativity, design, organization, etc)

SE: Work ethic.   While we all had different skills and personalities, every one of them worked their ass off.

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AA: What were some challenges for you personally during the filming? (design, construction, being away from family, etc)

SE: The biggest personal challenge I faced was being away from my kids. People think I’m a single dad with 6 kids at home. The truth is four of the six are grown and on their own. I have two minors that I get to see every weekend. But still very much involved with all of their lives. All the phone calls I was allowed was to my kids.

 

AA: When people watch Steampunk’d, what would you like for them to take away from the show and what was created that they could apply to their own work?

SE: I hope that if anything, they would see what amazing things can be created from discarded junk.

AA: How was it coming home and getting back to your regular schedule and life?

SE: The hardest part once I got home was that I didn’t even want to leave my house. It was hard to put the show away and get back to my normal life. But after a few days things were back to normal. I had more work than I knew what do with.

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AA: What suggestions do you have for people who are thinking of applying for a possible season 2?

SE: Be yourself and bring your A game.

 

AA: Now that the show has aired, what comes next for you?

SE: Now that the final episode has aired and everyone knows that I won – the whole world has changed for me. I’m getting requests for shows, interviews and more. But the most important thing is my plans to create opportunities for youth and adults alike – discovering their own creativity and incorporating Steampunk. I want to begin teaching workshops and get back to my own studio work.

 

AA: Looking beyond steampunk, what other interests fill your time?

SE: Drinking, chasing women and keeping one step ahead of the law.

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AA: How do those interests influence your work?

SE: Do I have to explain? Nuff said.

 

AA: There’s only so much time in a day – what interests don’t you have time for?

SE: I really want to learn ballroom dancing.

 

AA: What other fandoms are you part of (as a fan or participant) ?

SE: Capital Steam of Lansing, MI.

 

AA: What event or situation has had the most positive impact in your life? What has been your greatest challenge?

SE: Steampunk’d – it has been the most positive impact AND the most challenging.

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AA: Any final thoughts to share with our readers

SE: Be true to yourself and your creativity. At the end of the day – win or lose – you still gotta live with yourself. I would like to thank all the GSN cast and crew for making this a memorable experience and I was honored to compete against the best people/artists in the country. Thank you.

 

Thanks, Eddie, for joining us in this interview and for sharing all of your thoughts. We look forward to hearing about your next projects!

 

Keep up to date with Eddie’s latest news on his website.

Also, check out his exhibit page at The Steampunk Museum.

 

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Published in: on October 20, 2015 at 7:24 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Interview with Steampunk’d maker Ed ‘Steampunk Eddie’ Thayer

This week we are talking with Ed Thayer, better known as Steampunk Eddie, who was one of the ten contestants on Steampunk’d, from GSN, the Game Show Network. Steampunk’d is the first steampunk reality show to be broadcast on cable television.

 

Airship Ambassador: Hi Eddie, thanks for joining us this week.

Steampunk Eddie: Thanks, nice to be here.

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AA: What an amazing experience to be on the first steampunk reality show on TV. As a brief summary, how was it for you?

SE: BADASS. It was the most amazing experience in my life.

 

AA: How long have you been involved in the steampunk community and what brought you into it?

SE: About 3 years. I was doing some construction/rehab for a local Steampunk Theme Brewery. This is when I was first introduced to “Steampunk”. I thought it was so “me”. During the build I took scrap materials and found objects and took them home to my workshop. I ended up creating a 7’4” tall mechanical clock that became the showpiece of the new Brewery.

 

AA: How long have you been building and creating things, and how did you get started?

SE: I’ve been building custom cars and motorcycles for the past thirty years. I have been an artist my entire life … so this new Steampunk was just another creative outlet.

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AA: What is it about steampunk as an aesthetic that appeals to you?

SE: I love the vintage era when everything was handcrafted and then by adding the futuristic element – it gives it the wow factor.

 

AA: What are some designs or materials that you tend to work with the most?

SE: I use everything. Everything from copper, brass, steel, wood, gears, motors, paint and even an old boot if necessary.

 

AA: What are some signature elements in your work that make it stand out as recognizably something you created?

SE: Most of my work either, moves, lights up or has a functional purpose. That’s why it’s called “useable art with an attitude”.

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AA: What is something that you’d like to create but haven’t done so yet?

SE: My dream piece would be a big wind-powered sculpture in a public space. Something that makes people stop,stare..and never forget.

 

AA: How has your work changed over time? What are some key lessons you’ve learned along the way?

SE: I always try to top my last piece. My masterpiece has not yet been created. The major lesson I would like to share with other makers is – don’t compare yourself, your work or look to others for inspiration. My method is to depend upon my own creativity – not to seek other artist work as an inspiration. I have to be true to my own creative soul and by comparing or seeking others work just takes me out of my creative zone.

 

AA: Viewers of the show know that you were eliminated in the ### episode, but let’s start at the very beginning of the process. How did you first hear about the show and the opportunity to actually be on it?

SE: I was invited to exhibit at a prestigious event where I met a fellow artist who later urged me apply. I did and the network casting service contacted me shortly afterwards.

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AA: What was your interest or motivation to be on the show?

SE: My motivation was to give myself dedicated and uninterrupted time away to create the art I love. In fact this was the first time in my life I was given the opportunity to solely focus on my art. As most artists I have a lifetime of responsibilities and obligations to fulfill so I was looking forward to the time away and being challenged – against nine other top artists.

 

AA: Pop Magnet was the casting company chosen by Pink Sneakers, the production company, to find candidates for the show. What can you share with us about the interview process that you went through with them?

SE: It was a piece of cake. I say that because I was just being “me” throughout the process. I know myself well enough to know that I couldn’t operate if I tried to be anything different.   The casting company saw that and thought I would be a great addition to the show. Although there were times of uncertainty I knew at the end of the day if I was true to who I was they would ultimately decide if I was a good fit.

 

AA: The final part of the selection process was a sample challenge to steampunk a common everyday item. What was your item and what did you do with it?

SE: I created a BADASS steampunk hot air balloon from a typical world globe. It was BADASS.

 

We’ll break here in chatting with Eddie.

Join us for the conclusion as he continues to share his experiences on the show.

Keep up to date with Eddie’s latest news on his website.

Also, check out his exhibit page at The Steampunk Museum.

 

Published in: on October 19, 2015 at 7:22 pm  Comments (1)  
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Interview with Steampunk’d Maker Morgan Olson, Part 2

Welcome back for the conclusion in our talk with Morgan Olson, who was one of the ten contestants on Steampunk’d, from GSN, the Game Show Network. Steampunk’d is the first steampunk reality show to be broadcast on cable television.

Read part one here.

 

Airship Ambassador: Without giving spoilers, what interesting things might viewers see in the episodes you were in?

Morgan Olson: Art! and lots of it… I can switch gears pretty easy, sew, paint, build, and even do things like welding. I think of all the makers on the show, my range of skills was broadest so I always wanted to showcase another skill set I have in my tool belt.

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AA: What are some memorable moments you had during filming ?

MO: Welding the typewriter necklace in the Closet challenge, the Automaton head, and meeting some interesting new people, I did not know Thomas Willeford, and I find him highly amusing.

 

AA: What are some factors that you had in common with the other contestants or set you apart ?

MO: Professional Design career. I do art professionally, trained and resume of large companies. I am one of few people on the show this way, you can see that our career has taught us to react differently than someone on a hobby level. This was both an in common and set apart factor, professionals can sense each other, my choice of team mates was always very calculated.

 

AA: What were some challenges for you personally during the filming? (design, construction, being away from family, etc)

MO: Missing my tools, I can be picky about using certain tools, fabrics, machines. I really missed my own studio in this way, made me appreciate my own equipment.

 

AA: How was it coming home and getting back to your regular schedule and life?

MO: It was interesting getting back home. I actually kinda missed the routine of going to set everyday! I love how being on Steampunk’d is helping me pick up more interesting jobs also, worth my time on every level.

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AA: What suggestions do you have for people who are thinking of applying for a possible season 2?

MO: Ya gotta have a personality! Wet fish are not fun to watch on tv, but it’s also very important to be a hardcore artist. You really have to perform on many levels at once, thinking, making, timelines, team mates and fast too! Not for the faint of heart, ya gotta be balls to the wall.

 

AA: Now that the show has aired, what comes next for you?

MO: I own a custom request art Production company, I jumped right back into my booked projects. I’m designing a theater set and installing it, a sculpture for a performance artist, 3 Steampunk costumes ( my friends got very inspired) and I am working on my ecommerce website.

 

AA: Looking beyond steampunk, what other interests fill your time?

MO: I really enjoy music, I work music festival production. I also really like technology and learning new things. I’m the type of person who has been there, done that at least once, experience junkie. From sky diving to tv shows, I want to experience it all.

 

AA: How do those interests influence your work?

MO: It teaches me courage, which you need copious amounts of to run your own company. You have to try new things in life, and courage helps push through the fear of what might happen.

 

AA: There’s only so much time in a day what interests don’t you have time for?

MO: “I have time for work, and time for love. Beyond that, I have no time…” a famous CoCo Chanel quote that resonates with me. I’m here to “ be someone” and I am always happiest when doing something productive, funny enough I don’t even own a tv, sold it 10yrs ago, never looked back. I’m always busy doing things.

 

AA: What other fandoms are you part of?

MO: Hmm, I’m not really specifically into fandoms, but I have an appreciation for many things. I have made custom costumes for 15yrs, I am usually helping my clients attain their fandoms 🙂

 morgan-Emily Hampton

AA: Are there people you consider an inspiration, role model, or other motivating influence?

MO: CoCo Chanel, Richard Branson, Banksy. Genius personalities that create their own reality.

 

AA: What event or situation has had the most positive impact in your life? What has been your greatest challenge?

MO: Steampunk’d answers this question. Being on the show has definitely added a helpful level to my career. And to be honest, it has been the most challenging project I have ever worked on.

 

AA: Any final thoughts to share with our readers

MO: Making things with your hands, actually creating something yourself is such a rewarding feeling. If you want to be an artist, Make Art. If you want to write, start a book. The internet has changed the art world, being an artist is now easier than ever.

 

Thanks, Morgan, for joining us in this interview and for sharing all of your thoughts. We look forward to hearing about your next projects!

Keep up to date with Morgan’s latest news on her website.

Also, check out her exhibit page at The Steampunk Museum.

Published in: on October 15, 2015 at 6:34 pm  Comments (1)  
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