Airship Ambassador Interview #100, Part Four

aa-square300Welcome back for Part Four of Interview #100. Here is the second half of the answers to the second question.

Read Part One here. Current Involvement, Part one

Read Part Two here. Current Involvement, Part two

Read Part Three here. Opportunities, part one

 

What opportunities, steampunk or not, have come your way because of your involvement and work in steampunk?

 

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James Ng: Well, like I said so many years ago in my initial interview with you. I have always been fascinated by steampunk visuals and my interest in Chinese history inspired me to create my series. But I actually didn’t know the term “steampunk” until I posted my work online. But since my involvement with steampunk, my career became tied closely with the term. I’ve received many steampunk commissions and invitations from conventions and art shows. It has brought me to Korea, California, New York, London, Moscow, Italy and many other places.

Recently I am taking part in “Mechanical Wonders” group show in Vancouver BC, and also working on 2 steampunk illustration commissions as well as a steampunk themed beer label design.

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Gail Carriger: This is a hard question for me to answer as I owe my whole career to steampunk. So… everything?

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Richard Preston: Well, it was my steampunk series that got me my first literary agent and my first publisher deal, so obviously it has opened a lot of big doors for me. It also got me involved with Jeff VanderMeer, the author of the Southern Reach series, and he is a wonderful guy who has helped my career along, on top of him being a magnificent writer. I’ve also met a lot of great people in the steampunk world due to the smaller cons, including Tayliss Forge and a whole bunch of writers, and they have all been awfully nice.

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Diana Pho: Well, I could say that steampunk helped get my current job as an editor, because it if weren’t for my involvement for Tor.com’s steampunk blogging events, I don’t think I would’ve landed in Editorial. And the best part is making the jump from being a creator of artworks to becoming a facilitator of others’ steampunk (and SFF) works! I’m in a position to see the fiction I want to see come out into the world; Steeplejack and A Dead Djinn in Cairo are just two examples of the type of diverse stories I want to support.

Additionally, though I decided not to go the PhD route, my academic studies has been an exciting journey that has helped me get in touch with many fellow geek academics over the years. I’m still interested in academia — particularly digital humanities and media studies — and neither would’ve been on my radar if it wasn’t for the interdisciplinary nature of steampunk and the wide variety of intellectuals it draws in.

And, not the least, I’ve met some of my closest friends through steampunk (including you, Ambassador! 😉  The community has helped me during times in my life where I left the lowest; it has been a chosen family when I felt estranged from my birth one.

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Mike Perschon: I would say just about everything I’ve done in academia since 2010 is because of my involvement and work in steampunk. I’ve not had to work hard to get publications – they come my way. Even this book opportunity fell into my lap, so to speak. Being one of the only people on the planet taking steampunk seriously has been very, very good for my career.

 

Join us tomorrow for answers to the next question in Part Five of Interview #100!

 

Thanks to everyone who has participated:

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine, read the first interview here.

Evan Butterfield, read the first interview here.

Gail Carriger, read the first interview here.

Jaymee Goh, read the first interview here.

James Ng, read the first interview here.

Mike Perschon, read the first interview here.

Diana Pho, read the first interview here.

Richard Preston, read the first interview here.

Lev AC Rosen, read the first interview here.

Arthur Slade, read the first interview here.

Nick Valentino, read the first interview here.

Jean-Christophe Valtat, read the first interview here.

 

Thanks for all of your support and encouragement!

Published in: on December 21, 2016 at 6:25 pm  Comments (6)  
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Airship Ambassador Interview #100, Part Three

aa-square300Welcome back for Part Three of Interview #100. Here is the first half of the answers to the second question.

Read Part One here. Current Involvement, Part one

Read Part Two here. Current Involvement, Part two

 

What opportunities, steampunk or not, have come your way because of your involvement and work in steampunk?

 

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Lev AC Rosen: I got to read and talk about Ada Byron at the New York Victorian Society’s Ada Lovelace day, which was excellent.  Apparently, the depiction of Ada in All Men of Genius has been written about in various essays and books, which is awesome.  I didn’t realize I was so academic.

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Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine: We have received more invitations for works in anthologies, both in the United States and overseas, on account of our work in the Ministry. We were also approached to have our universe turned into a FATE-Core roleplaying game, The Ministry Initiative by Galileo Games.

Finally, we were featured VIP guests alongside NYT Bestseller Gail Carriger at Reconnaissance, the official Science Fiction convention of New Zealand; and VIP guests of Steampunk H.Q., the modern art-hands on museum in Steampunk Oamaru, New Zealand.

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Arthur Slade: Well, I continue to publish books with a variety of publishers and my latest book, Flickers, came out in May (2016). The Hunchback Assignments was my first series of books to find international acclaim and that opened the door for me to work with several publishers in other countries. The series also brought my work to the attention of two film companies, who I’m working with right now to develop the series into a movie. I will admit that I have a background role. I’m not a script writer and wanted the pros to handle that.

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Jaymee Goh: Hrm, most of my opportunities have come from being very vocal on social media. Definitely The Sea Is Ours is a result of the publisher liking what I do in steampunk. I’ve also been able to present at conferences and met some very excellent people, and been invited to present at conventions, too. My paper on mad science in steampunk at the International Conference of the Fantastic in the Arts, for example, led to a reading invitation. I’m also editing this year’s WisCon Chronicles, an anthology series which records and explores the ongoing discourses happening at WisCon, a feminist science fiction convention in Madison, WI. Vintage Tomorrows, a documentary on steampunk that interviewed me, was just released.

But I’ve also been invited as a guest to conventions which have led me to meet people I never would have met otherwise. My first GearCon in Portland put me in the immediate vicinity of James Carrott and the Vintage Tomorrows film crew, and about 5 years after, the documentary is now on Netflix.

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Jean-Christophe Valtat: It has been a boon for my books, giving them an audience able to relate to what I was doing, however strange it was.

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Nick Valentino: There are too many to name. I’ve found a new group of friends, even some I consider family from nearly every state in the country and in Canada. When I went on the year long book tour for Thomas Riley, I met more amazing people than I could ever have imagined. (Including my wife) In meeting those people, I have gotten connected with literally hundreds of awesome opportunities. I’ve been a part of 4 steampunk anthologies, been in an issue of Steampunk Magazine, done hundreds of panels, been a guest or guest of honor at conferences all across the country and gotten the opportunity to tour Canada with my books. I was part of NAIBA (New Atlantic Independent Booksellers Association in Atlantic City. I’ve been able to be a part of Book Festivals from San Diego to Maryland. All of this because I decided to write a “niche” steampunk book and get involved with the fandom, the culture, and the people. I now have the most creative and wonderful friends all over the place and it’s something I wouldn’t trade from the world.

The biggest thing to come from writing this book and getting involved with Steampunk, is the fact that I met my wife at The World Steam Expo in Dearborn Michigan. That changed my life in the most amazing ways. I’m a better person than I used to be because of that one conference. Literally, I owe the community of steampunk everything just for that chance encounter.

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Evan Butterfield: My steampunk shoots have gotten me connected with professional models, and I’ve worked with a number of them on steampunk- and non-steampunk-related shoots.

 

Join us tomorrow for the second half of answers to this question in Part Four of Interview #100!

 

Thanks to everyone who has participated:

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine, read the first interview here.

Evan Butterfield, read the first interview here.

Gail Carriger, read the first interview here.

Jaymee Goh, read the first interview here.

James Ng, read the first interview here.

Mike Perschon, read the first interview here.

Diana Pho, read the first interview here.

Richard Preston, read the first interview here.

Lev AC Rosen, read the first interview here.

Arthur Slade, read the first interview here.

Nick Valentino, read the first interview here.

Jean-Christophe Valtat, read the first interview here.

 

Thanks for all of your support and encouragement!

Published in: on December 20, 2016 at 7:20 pm  Comments (8)  
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Airship Ambassador Interview #100, Part Two

aa-square300Welcome back for Part Two of Interview #100. Here are the second half of the answers to the first question.

Read Part One here. Current Involvement, Part one

 

What is your current involvement in steampunk today?

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Evan Butterfield: I’m continuing to explore the darker end of steampunk–most of the “characters” I create with my models are somehow the disturbed and mentally twisted products of a society sort of soaked in dirty fog and mysterious, rarified aethers (oddly enough, the alternative reality I’ve created in my head is most definitely not one I would very much like to live in).

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James Ng: I’m working on my own steampunk project, Imperial Steam & Light. I’ve spent the last 3 months working with an author for a script for a comic book, we have the first 5 chapters ~250pages drafted. But there is alot more work to be done, character design to refine, story plotholes to fix etc. It has been an amazing ride, I am so excited to share this with everyone soon. Especially the Steampunk community that supported me through out the years.

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Gail Carriger: I just returned from the Gaslight Gathering and San Diego, a great little steampunk event, and my last for this year. Next year, I’ll be returning to the Steampunk Worlds Fair in New Jersey in May, just after having visited Alaska for their Steampunk Symposium. It’ll be a very steampunk spring for me.

In writing, I’m still plugging away. My steampunk universe has now been officially dubbed the Parasolverse. Right now I have one ongoing novel series with Orbit, the Custard Protocol series. I’ll be writing the third one in that series next year with an eye to release in 2018, but nothing concrete.

Meanwhile, I’ve started two new series in the Parasolverse, which I’m self publishing. The Delightfully Deadly novellas, which are romances featuring lady spies. And the Supernatural Society novellas, which all feature LBGTQ characters. I’m using these to build bridges between steampunk, urban fantasy, romance, and other genres. For example, the first Delightfully Deadly novella, Poison or Protect, played on the idea of a spy thriller meets Regency house party. The first Supernatural Society novella, Romancing the Inventor, has an Upstairs Downstairs feel to it (being told from the perspective of an upstairs maid in a vampire hive).

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Richard Preston: Hi Kevin! It’s a real honor to be invited to participate in your event here on Airship Ambassador. Currently I am continuing my Chronicles of the Pneumatic Zeppelin steampunk adventure series, a project which you have so kindly supported from the very beginning. Book 4 will be arriving sometime in 2017. I’m also attending some local steampunk conventions, including the brand new SCV Comic Con last month and the Oxnard Steamfest coming up this weekend (Oct 15,16). I was more involved with the bigger cons previously (San Diego Comic Con, as an attendee) and the great Anomalycon in Denver (not big, but very steampunk).

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Diana Pho: Steampunk has helped me expand my personal and professional goals and my creative vision in a lot of ways, though in other ways I’m not as active in steampunk as I used to be.  I don’t perform as my steampunk persona as often anymore, and the number of steampunk conventions I attend has also been more selective. due to my schedule. Beyond Victoriana is still one of the best long-term projects I’ve done thus far, but I also know that I can’t commit to the same schedule as I had when it started in 2009. Still, I’m pretty happy that it has been recognized as an influential resource and source of inspiration in the community.

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Mike Perschon: I’m currently writing a book called Steampunk FAQ for Applause, which is an imprint of the Hal Leonard company (the sheet music people!). For the record, that’s why I hardly ever blog any more. When the book is done, I’ll get back to blogging.

 

Join us tomorrow for answers to the next question in Part Three of Interview #100!

 

Thanks to everyone who has participated:

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine, read the first interview here.

Evan Butterfield, read the first interview here.

Gail Carriger, read the first interview here.

Jaymee Goh, read the first interview here.

James Ng, read the first interview here.

Mike Perschon, read the first interview here.

Diana Pho, read the first interview here.

Richard Preston, read the first interview here.

Lev AC Rosen, read the first interview here.

Arthur Slade, read the first interview here.

Nick Valentino, read the first interview here.

Jean-Christophe Valtat, read the first interview here.

 

Thanks for all of your support and encouragement!

 

Published in: on December 19, 2016 at 8:25 pm  Comments (8)  
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