Call for Artists – National Railway Museum Steampunk Art Exhibit

Original PDF Document Here


Information for Artists

 
Steampunk: Art inspired by the world of Steampunk
NationalRailway Museum, Tuesday 1 August 2017 – Sunday 17 September 2017

 
DATES:
Exhibition dates: The exhibition will be held at the National Railway Museum (NRM) from Tuesday 1 August 2017 – Sunday 17 September 2017, and will run during our Steampunk weekend (19 – 20 August 2017).

 
Artist Registration form submission: no later than 4pm Monday 24 April 2017, in order to be included in the SALA program

 
DELIVERY:
All works must be delivered to the Museum between Tuesday 11 and Friday 14 July 2017 at a time organised with Moana Colmer, Curator, Exhibits or Shylie Edwards, Graphic Designer, unless alternative arrangements have been made with Shylie or Moana.

 
Items can be delivered in person, or via courier addressed to:
The National Railway Museum
Steampunk Exhibition 2017
Attn: Moana Colmer (Curator, Exhibits)
76 Lipson St,
Port Adelaide,
SA 5015

 
COLLECTION:
Art must be collected between Wednesday 20 September and Wednesday 27 September 2017, at a time arranged with Moana or Shylie; unless an alternative collection date has been organised with Moana or Shylie.
Work that is not collected by 4pm Friday 1 December 2017 will be disposed of at the discretion of the National Railway Museum.

 
CONTACT:
Exhibition curator:
Moana Colmer (Curator, Exhibits)
curatorexhibit@nrm.org.au
08 8341 1690

 

Alternate contact:
Shylie Edwards (Graphic Designer)
graphics@nrm.org.au
08 8341 1690

 
ARTWORK THEME:
All art submissions should be inspired by Steampunk, you can interpret the theme ‘Steampunk: Art inspired by the world of Steampunk’ as you wish.
Items can be dark/ mysterious, even a little scary, but should not be offensive, i.e. they should be appropriate for a general audience. Contact Moana (Curator, Exhibits) if you are unsure whether your art is appropriate for this display.

 
ARTWORK TYPE & SIZE:
Can be any 3D item e.g. 3D sculpture, textiles, fashion accessories or jewellery.
Maximum 3 pieces per artist, unless alternative arrangements have been organised with Shylie or Moana.
3D items should be no larger than*:
Max width: 650mm

Max depth: 650mm

Max height: 1350mm

Max weight: 15kg
*Unless alternative arrangements have been approved by Moana.

 
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY:
1. Entries will undergo a selection process. Due to the popularity of the exhibition it is possible that some entries will not be accepted and displayed. The Museum reserves the right to withdraw entries not complying with selection criteria & or conditions.
2. Entries must be the original work of entrant (not copied) and must not breach or violate copyright/ moral rights and intellectual property laws; ensuring this is the responsibility of the artist.
3. The title for each art work must be identifiable for ease of installation by curatorial staff.
4. Items can be offered for sale during the exhibition and artists are invited to promote themselves (see the Artist Promotion section in registration form).
5. Artists are responsible for being the point of contact in relation to any enquiries regarding their work, including sales.
6. Maximum of 3 entries per Artist, unless approved by Moana.
7. Entries cannot be removed during the exhibition, unless arranged with Moana or Shylie.
8. Entrants agree to permit the National Railway Museum to reproduce their work, for exhibition promotional purposes only.
9. The National Railway Museum will exercise all due care in relation to the exhibits, but cannot accept responsibility/liability for any loss (including theft) or damage, either in custody or transit. Nor will the National Railway Museum incur any expense regarding packaging or transportation of the exhibits. Insurance of exhibits is the entrant’s responsibility.

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Published in: on January 29, 2017 at 12:54 pm  Comments (1)  
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Airship Ambassador Interview #100, Conclusion

aa-square300Welcome back for the conclusion, Part Ten of Interview #100. Here are answers to the seventh and last question.

Read Part One here. Current Involvement, Part one

Read Part Two here. Current Involvement, Part two

Read Part Three here. Opportunities, part one

Read Part Four here. Opportunities, part two

Read Part Five here. Changes, part one

Read Part Six here. Changes, part two

Read Part Seven here. Next in Steampunk

Read Part Eight here. Personally affected

Read Part Nine here. Items of Note

 

Anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

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Lev AC Rosen:  I have had three books come out since All Men of Genius: Depth, a noir science fiction that takes place in NYC after the ice caps have melted and it’s all tops of buildings, but written in a very classically noir style.  Woundabout: a children’s book illustrated by my brother in which a brother and sister come to a strange, mechanically driven town where nothing every changes.  This one is probably my most steampunk.  And just this September, my most recent book, The Memory Wall, was released.  It’s a younger YA/older MG book about a boy who’s mother has early-onset Alzheimer’s, which he’s determined to prove is a misdiagnosis by proving a character in his video game is actually his mother, playing online from the home she lives in.  It’s told alternately in the real world and in the high fantasy game world, which has some steampunk bits.

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Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine: With the fifth and final season of Tales from the Archives launching soon and Operation: Endgame slated in 2017, it may sound like we are bidding farewell to the genre; but the truth is we enjoy it too much to step out. We’re launching a Y.A. series, and we are brainstorming ideas for another spinoff. So while the adventures of Books & Braun are drawing to a close, it doesn’t mean we are no longer writing steampunk. If people still enjoy our adventures into the Past That Never Was, rest assured—we will continue to write them.

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Arthur Slade: Just keep creating. And having fun.

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Jaymee Goh: There is more to steampunk than the shiny. Whether in the literature or in the aesthetic, there is an underlying challenge to re-think the way we do technology and history, both separately and together.

Many of us doing steampunk also do other things which are fun and shiny, and I invite readers to check out the oeuvre of steampunk’s favourite artists beyond their steampunk work.

JCV-2

Jean-Christophe Valtat: I am currently rereading Kafka’s In the Penal Colony, and I was telling myself it’s excellent steampunk !

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Nick Valentino: Thank you for including me in part of the 100th interview! I am truly honored. It has been so much fun!

blog-Evan

Evan Butterfield: Well, I think I’ve probably said enough. Of course I’d encourage them to visit ebutterfieldphotography.com, and to buy my photos and books and calendars, and share ideas for projects we could do together, but other than that–no, nothing.

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James Ng: This is a good opportunity for me to say thank you. Some readers might remember me from your early interviews, I think I was one of your first interviewees? I was just a student back then, but the interview drew me into this Steampunk community that supported me for my whole career. It was completely unexpected at that time, I only did these artwork as entertainment to myself, but the feedback from the Steampunk crowd taught me that there is value in my work and that my art is worth investing into. The support gave me courage to invest my money and time to push my project to the next level. I’ve started a company and have invested alot into a comic book based in my Chinese Steampunk world. Please look out for JamesNgArt’s Imperial Steam & Light on Kickstarter in the coming future. I can’t wait to share more!

gailcarriger

Gail Carriger: My latest book, Romancing the Inventor, is out November 1, 2016. It features a fan favorite character, Madame Lefoux, a brilliant lonely cross-dressing inventor, and the parlourmaid who falls in love with her. It’s relatively light on steampunk, but still there, and several other familiar faces also show up. However, you don’t have to have read any of my other books to enjoy this one. http://gailcarriger.com/books/romancing-the-inventor/

REPreston Author photo 1

Richard Preston: I urge them to support Airship Ambassador and participate in the steampunk community doors opened here. You helped me a lot when I was just getting started and you still do, and it is much appreciated.

Nova-Ay-Leen-Chang-1

Diana Pho: I think I covered all my bases 😉

 

Thanks to everyone who has participated:

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine, read the first interview here.

Evan Butterfield, read the first interview here.

Gail Carriger, read the first interview here.

Jaymee Goh, read the first interview here.

James Ng, read the first interview here.

Mike Perschon, read the first interview here.

Diana Pho, read the first interview here.

Richard Preston, read the first interview here.

Lev AC Rosen, read the first interview here.

Arthur Slade, read the first interview here.

Nick Valentino, read the first interview here.

Jean-Christophe Valtat, read the first interview here.

 

Thanks for all of your support and encouragement!

Here’s looking forward to the next 100 interviews!

 

Published in: on December 30, 2016 at 7:16 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Airship Ambassador Interview #100, Part Nine

aa-square300Welcome back for Part Nine of Interview #100. Here are answers to the sixth question.

Read Part One here. Current Involvement, Part one

Read Part Two here. Current Involvement, Part two

Read Part Three here. Opportunities, part one

Read Part Four here. Opportunities, part two

Read Part Five here. Changes, part one

Read Part Six here. Changes, part two

Read Part Seven here. Next in Steampunk

Read Part Eight here. Personally affected

 

What is something noteworthy about steampunk which people should know about?

 

pip-tee-MIGeekScene

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine: There are no limitations to this genre. It is open to all ages, all genders, all races, all sexual orientations. You can set your steampunk in our past, or you can set it in a universe completely your own. Because of the limitless possibilities of steampunk, anything is possible.

Nova-Jha-1

Jaymee Goh: Steampunk is the funnest form of counter-history. I love big machines and cannot lie.

JCV-1

Jean-Christophe Valtat: Well, everybody knows that, I guess, but I am struck by the fact that early steampunk had an interest in evolutionary science, which perhaps has been superseded by a more industrial, mechanical approach to the genre. I think the broader scope is always the best.

steamcon-2-kevin-nick-2

Nick Valentino: Steampunk is an all inclusive, no-holds-barred ride of wonderful. There are few things like it in the world and I hope that people continue to be drawn to it and make it even better than it is today. Sure it has it’s drama and egos and BS from time to time, but it’s noteworthy not only because of it’s creativity and ability to inspire, but it’s a fun )and good looking) culture that everyone can be a part of.

blog-Evan

Evan Butterfield: I think the thing that saves steampunk for the longer term is that it’s not recreating or reenacting, it’s creating and making and developing something very new that just looks old. We all have these alt-hists going on, and some of them are parallel and mesh together and some of them veer off wildly and just barely stay on the “steampunk spectrum.” But that’s what makes it unique, that diversity and all the different visions. Some people are all Cthulhu and Lovecraft, and some are total pirates and airships and badass women in corsets; some are just Proper Victorians with elaborate timepieces, and some people just stick gears on stuff and call it steampunk, and others go whole-hog into dieselpunk and teslapunk, which–and I know this is heretical to some–are still on the steamy spectrum in my mind: it all sort of flows together. OK I know that this wasn’t the question, but here’s my beef: there appears to be a growing number of orthodox steampunks in the digital world who are always poised to archly condemn this or that as “not steampunk.” A lot of what I’ve done has fallen into that critique, and I think the very last thing that we need are keepers-of-the-flame who pronounce what is and is not allowable. The way a culture grows is by evolving through experimentation and diversity; the way it dies is to define everything to death until it all calcifies in a boring, gray, lifeless monument to what was. I think we really need to beware of these self-appointed “protectors.” Anyway, you didn’t ask, but that’s my speech.

gailcarriger

Gail Carriger: One of the places steampunk still thrives is on Pinterest. I hang out there a lot these days.

REPreston Author photo 1

Richard Preston: I think people should know that steampunk, even though it has such a gorgeous exterior in terms of look, such as the clothing, accessories and architecture, is also a place where the great themes of life and love can all be explored as deep as a creative artist wants to go. I’m not knocking costuming and cosplaying in any way–its such a joyous expression of the creative heart, and it is a vibrant community–but I hope people realize that steampunk goes far beyond its costumes, just like Star Wars and Game of Thrones do.

Nova-Ay-Leen-Chang-1

Diana Pho: Happening now? There is Steampunk Universe, which is the latest fiction anthology focusing on disabled and neuroatypical characters, coming from Alliteration Ink. Or Like Clockwork, the latest academic anthology from University of Minnesota Press this December. And the Airship Ashanti is producing a 2017 multicultural steampunk calendar too! What I love about the community is that it is always growing and producing things that can be expanding our creative horizons–nd in some small way, have an impact on our greater world.

MikePerschon

Mike Perschon:  You aren’t doing it wrong.

 

Join us tomorrow for answers to the last question in Part Ten of Interview #100!

 

Thanks to everyone who has participated:

Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine, read the first interview here.

Evan Butterfield, read the first interview here.

Gail Carriger, read the first interview here.

Jaymee Goh, read the first interview here.

James Ng, read the first interview here.

Mike Perschon, read the first interview here.

Diana Pho, read the first interview here.

Richard Preston, read the first interview here.

Lev AC Rosen, read the first interview here.

Arthur Slade, read the first interview here.

Nick Valentino, read the first interview here.

Jean-Christophe Valtat, read the first interview here.

 

Thanks for all of your support and encouragement!

Published in: on December 29, 2016 at 8:11 pm  Comments (1)  
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